This Is How Long the New Covid-19 Vaccine Will Protect You

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Since the news came out that a COVID-19 vaccine is on the horizon, the world has been overjoyed. Finally, we have the chance to fight the pandemic off, but that doesn’t mean that questions about the vaccine haven’t cropped up. And for good reason, since we should all be aware of how it’ll work and what we should expect prior to it hitting the shelves.

Scientists have been hard at work not only testing the vaccine but figuring out how long recipients will be safe after taking the shots.

Research published in the New England Journal of Medicine says that Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine would protect recipients for 119 days- around three months. This was found out after scientists followed up with 34 patients that already took the vaccine.

Of note is the fact that this doesn’t mean your immunity will last for just three months. This is simply the length of time that recipients have been studied for and, as time goes by, so will the numbers.

A few weeks after inoculation, the number of antibodies did drop off in the 34 patients. After a brief period, they leveled out and then remained stable after 119 days.

So, with that in mind, scientists are still keeping a close eye on how things will evolve. But until we have more answers, let’s look at who will receive the vaccine first.

As we all know, nothing can be produced and sent out in record-breaking time and seeing as this is a global pandemic that we’re currently dealing with, it makes sense that certain people would become inoculated first. Some individuals are more likely to receive the vaccine earlier on while others have to wait their turn and adhere to safety guidelines- staying indoors, washing their hands, avoiding crowds, etc.

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